Differences Between Red and White Wine Production

Wine pic
Wine
Image: winery.csu.edu

Serving as Oracle Corporation’s senior director of strategic accounts since 2006, Dr. Antoine Chaya has a PhD in information technology management, as well as numerous years of experience in the information technology field. When he isn’t working, Antoine Chaya likes to indulge in Napa Valley wines.

Napa Valley wineries offer a range of red and white wines. But what are the differences between the two, besides color? Though both types of wine are made from grapes, the processes used to make red and white wine differ slightly. White wine can be produced from either dark- or light-colored grapes, while red wine is made exclusively using dark-colored grapes. This is because the color of wine depends on the amount of tannin, a naturally occurring polyphenol, found in the skins, seeds, and stems of grapes. The production of white, or colorless, wine involves fermenting grape juice. On the other hand, red wine is made by fermenting grape juice, pieces of grapes, and grape stems. Fermenting all parts of the grapes effectively preserves the tannins, lending the wine its standard reddish quality.

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Antoine Chaya

With comprehensive expertise in information technology and finance, Antoine Chaya leads Strategic Accounts at Oracle Corporation as the division’s Senior Director. Responsible for the implementation of some of its most complex global projects, Antoine Chaya remains an invaluable company asset. Previously, Antoine Chaya acted as the Director of Consulting at Oracle Corporation. Antoine Chaya received his Doctor of Philosophy in Information Technology Management and his Master of Business Administration in Finance and Accounting from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Passionate about his discipline, Antoine Chaya taught in the College of Management at the Georgia Institute of Technology before transitioning to Oracle Corporation.

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